Peter Puget. Lieutenant on the Vancouver Expedition, fighting British naval officer, the man for whom Puget Sound was named. Nautical History, Robert C. Wing, Gordon Newell.

Peter Puget. Lieutenant on the Vancouver Expedition, fighting British naval officer, the man for whom Puget Sound was named.

Seattle: Gray Beard Publishing, 1979. First Printing of the First US Edition. A Fine copy in a Near Fine price clipped dust jacket with some crinkling to the laminate in the rear panel. The book is an essential reference for readers interested in seafaring novels about the Royal Navy during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. It is the biography of Rear Admiral Peter Puget, covering his entire naval career from the time he was a midshipman (starting at the age of 12 in 1778) serving in the West Indies during the American Revolution, to his final assignment as Naval Commissioner in India, with details of his final days in England, and some details on his children. A large segment of the book deals with Puget's service as second lieutenant aboard His Majesty's sloop Discovery under the command of George Vancouver during that ship's voyage to the northwest coast of North America (1791-1795). It provides valuable insight into that voyage and the personality of Captain George Vancouver (Vancouver had served with Captain James Cook on both his second and third voyages). Lieutenant Puget was promoted to lieutenant at the age of 25 . The voyage of the Discovery started out soon after the mutiny aboard the H.M.S. Bounty, with the result that a consort, the armed tender Chatham under the command of Lieutenant William Robert Broughton, was sent to accompany the Discovery. George Vancouver and William Bligh had served together on Captain Cook's third voyage, Bligh being the sailing master. There is no doubt that the mutiny on the Bounty influenced Vancouver's attitudes towards his officers and men. Item #26472
ISBN: 0933686005

Price: $75.00