Item #26884 The Hellfighters of Harlem: African-American Soldiers Who Fought for the Right to Fight for Their Country. African-Americans in WWI, Bill Harris.

The Hellfighters of Harlem: African-American Soldiers Who Fought for the Right to Fight for Their Country.

New York: Carroll & Graf, 2002. First Printing of the First US Edition. A Fine unread copy in a Fine dust jacket. This saga of black soldiers whose struggle to reach the front lines was shadowed by racism begins with debates among black leaders over whether African-Americans should withhold support for the war until steps toward equality were made, then follows the harrowing path of the 15th Regiment of Colored Infantryís formation which, lacking a proper armory, drilled in the streets of Harlem and a local dance hall. The 15th was ready to fight by 1917, but was forbidden from serving under U.S. command by General John J. Pershing, who handed over the re-named 369th to the French Army. This story of arms and a bandóled by jazz pioneer Lieutenant James Reese Europeóthat toured Europeís hospitals, villages, and cities, is an important portrait of the soldiers whose return to U.S. soil, complete with a spectacular parade up Fifth Avenue, helped fuel the Harlem Renaissance. Item #26884
ISBN: 0786710500

Price: $45.00

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